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IAQ

Indoor air quality refers to the quality of air within buildings and structures and how it affects the health and safety of its occupants. A number of factors contribute to indoor air quality such as ventilation, temperature, humidity and biological and chemical contaminants present inside a building or household. Indoor air quality directly impacts our health and can cause serious health issues if it is not maintained. Indeed, concentrations of many pollutants are often two to five times higher indoors than outdoors.

Studies have concluded that approximately 3.8 million people around the world die every year from indoor air pollution. As a result, it is considered one of the top five environmental risks to public health. In fact, the EPA estimates that substandard indoor air quality impacts 33% to 50% of commercial buildings in the U.S. and is responsible for over 10 million lost work days per year.

Health problems caused by indoor air pollution include headaches, burning nose, worsening allergies, flu-like symptoms, respiratory issues, cancer, heart disease, and even death if pollutants such as carbon monoxide occur in high concentrations.

Common Indoor Pollutants

The EPA breaks down common indoor pollutants that are present in many homes into three different categories: biological, chemical, and combustion pollutants.

checklist of indoor air pollutants


Biological pollutants


Mold

Mold spores, one of the most common biological pollutants, are present everywhere in our outdoor environment and are often found indoors as well. They can find their way into your home through doorways, vents, and windows. Spores can also attach themselves to your clothing or shoes. Generally, mold growth occurs in areas of high humidity or water damage such as a leaky roof or damp basement. Health problems caused by indoor mold include throat and eye irritation, coughing or wheezing, and other upper respiratory symptoms. In addition, mold can be especially difficult for people who suffer from allergies or other respiratory ailments such as asthma or emphysema.

At Mold Authority, we conduct mold inspection and testing to evaluate mold damage present in homes or buildings. We start by looking for conditions that may have caused mold to grow, and then we identify areas that may need repair. We also take samples for testing, so we can give recommendations based on the type of mold present in your house or office. Our goal is not just to find the source of the problem but to provide a solution to eliminate it.

Allergens/Bacteria/Pollen

Unfortunately, dust mite allergens exist in every home no matter how clean it might be. They also happen to be one of the most powerful of the biological allergens and can exacerbate asthma. They are not the only threat, however, as pollen, pet dander, and other airborne bacteria can easily find their way inside your home and cause allergic reactions. If you believe that you have allergens in your carpets or indoor air, Mold Authority can test to figure out which environmental hazard is present in your home. Based on our findings, we will suggest an appropriate course of action to stop or reduce exposure to known allergens.

Chemical Pollutants


Volatile Organic Compounds

Chemical pollutants found in homes include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like formaldehyde, cleaning agents, paint, and aerosol sprays. VOCs, however, are dangerous because they are one of the main causes of poor indoor air quality. Found both outdoors and indoors, VOCs are often released as gases by manufacturing and industrial processes or from products like cleaning supplies. They are often detected by their odors. Furthermore, VOC contamination can also come from outside sources such as polluted groundwater.

Mold Authority has the expertise to know when VOCs are present and how to measure and control them. In collaboration with top national labs, we provide testing services for VOCs in air, water, soil, and consumer products. Our testing methods ensure that any issues present at a property will be discovered and a real solution will be provided to permanently correct the problem.

Lead

Another common chemical contaminant to watch out for is lead. Old lead-based paint is the most significant source of lead exposure in the U.S. today. In addition to affecting nearly all systems in the body, lead can be especially severe to fetuses and young children. If you have any concerns about possible lead exposure, our licensed and experienced professionals can provide professional, cost-effective services related to lead identification issues in your home, office or dwelling.

Radon

Radon gas exposure in a household or commercial building can also cause major health problems. Radon is an odorless, tasteless, invisible gas and a proven carcinogen. In fact, radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Radon is present both outdoors and indoors in every type of building. Because there is no known safe level of exposure to radon, the EPA recommends that Americans do radon testing and consider fixing their homes when the radon level is between 2pCi/L and 4pCi/L. In contrast, the average concentration of radon in outdoor air is .4pCi/L or 1/10th of EPA’s 4pCi/L action level.

Combustion Pollutants

Combustion pollutants such as carbon monoxide and tobacco smoke are also a threat to indoor air quality and your health.

Carbon Monoxide

Unlike VOCs, one cannot taste, smell or see carbon monoxide. At lower concentrations it can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, or chest pain. At higher concentrations, however, it can cause unconsciousness and death. Primary sources of carbon monoxide include kerosene and gas space heaters, fireplaces, generators, and poorly maintained boilers and furnaces. For this reason, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that consumers have a professional inspection of all fuel-burning appliances like furnaces, stoves, fireplaces, clothes dryers, water heaters, and space heaters, to detect dangerous carbon monoxide leaks.

Other combustion pollutants such as tobacco smoke are easier to identify or at least detect from their odor. When the source of an odor cannot be determined, indoor air quality (IAQ) testing may be necessary. Our qualified environmental and IAQ professionals at Mold Authority know what to look for and how to identify the causes of problematic odors.

New York Indoor Air Quality Inspection Service

Whether your problem is a biological, chemical or combustion pollutant, Mold Authority can identify it and develop an effective strategy to eliminate or reduce harmful exposures. We provide indoor air quality testing in order to safeguard the health of your family or coworkers. Within New York City, we offer mold and air quality inspection and testing services in the Bronx (Bronx County), Brooklyn (Kings County), Manhattan (New York County), Queens (Queens County) and Staten Island (Richmond County). If you live in the New York Metropolitan area, contact Mold Authority to speak to one of our trained staff about your air quality issues.

Indoor Air Quality in NYC


MOLD

ASBESTOS

LEAD

RADON

ALLERGENS / BACTERIA

VOC's


ODOR ID

WATER

WATER DAMAGE

MOISTURE MAPPING

IAQ

CLEARANCE TESTING

IAQ

Indoor air quality refers to the quality of air within buildings and structures and how it affects the health and safety of its occupants. A number of factors contribute to indoor air quality such as ventilation, temperature, humidity and biological and chemical contaminants present inside a building or household. Indoor air quality directly impacts our health and can cause serious health issues if it is not maintained. Indeed, concentrations of many pollutants are often two to five times higher indoors than outdoors.

Studies have concluded that approximately 3.8 million people around the world die every year from indoor air pollution. As a result, it is considered one of the top five environmental risks to public health. In fact, the EPA estimates that substandard indoor air quality impacts 33% to 50% of commercial buildings in the U.S. and is responsible for over 10 million lost work days per year.

Health problems caused by indoor air pollution include headaches, burning nose, worsening allergies, flu-like symptoms, respiratory issues, cancer, heart disease, and even death if pollutants such as carbon monoxide occur in high concentrations.

Common Indoor Pollutants

The EPA breaks down common indoor pollutants that are present in many homes into three different categories: biological, chemical, and combustion pollutants.

checklist of indoor air pollutants


Biological pollutants


Mold

Mold spores, one of the most common biological pollutants, are present everywhere in our outdoor environment and are often found indoors as well. They can find their way into your home through doorways, vents, and windows. Spores can also attach themselves to your clothing or shoes. Generally, mold growth occurs in areas of high humidity or water damage such as a leaky roof or damp basement. Health problems caused by indoor mold include throat and eye irritation, coughing or wheezing, and other upper respiratory symptoms. In addition, mold can be especially difficult for people who suffer from allergies or other respiratory ailments such as asthma or emphysema.

At Mold Authority, we conduct mold inspection and testing to evaluate mold damage present in homes or buildings. We start by looking for conditions that may have caused mold to grow, and then we identify areas that may need repair. We also take samples for testing, so we can give recommendations based on the type of mold present in your house or office. Our goal is not just to find the source of the problem but to provide a solution to eliminate it.

Allergens/Bacteria/Pollen

Unfortunately, dust mite allergens exist in every home no matter how clean it might be. They also happen to be one of the most powerful of the biological allergens and can exacerbate asthma. They are not the only threat, however, as pollen, pet dander, and other airborne bacteria can easily find their way inside your home and cause allergic reactions. If you believe that you have allergens in your carpets or indoor air, Mold Authority can test to figure out which environmental hazard is present in your home. Based on our findings, we will suggest an appropriate course of action to stop or reduce exposure to known allergens.

Chemical Pollutants


Volatile Organic Compounds

Chemical pollutants found in homes include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like formaldehyde, cleaning agents, paint, and aerosol sprays. VOCs, however, are dangerous because they are one of the main causes of poor indoor air quality. Found both outdoors and indoors, VOCs are often released as gases by manufacturing and industrial processes or from products like cleaning supplies. They are often detected by their odors. Furthermore, VOC contamination can also come from outside sources such as polluted groundwater.

Mold Authority has the expertise to know when VOCs are present and how to measure and control them. In collaboration with top national labs, we provide testing services for VOCs in air, water, soil, and consumer products. Our testing methods ensure that any issues present at a property will be discovered and a real solution will be provided to permanently correct the problem.

Lead

Another common chemical contaminant to watch out for is lead. Old lead-based paint is the most significant source of lead exposure in the U.S. today. In addition to affecting nearly all systems in the body, lead can be especially severe to fetuses and young children. If you have any concerns about possible lead exposure, our licensed and experienced professionals can provide professional, cost-effective services related to lead identification issues in your home, office or dwelling.

Radon

Radon gas exposure in a household or commercial building can also cause major health problems. Radon is an odorless, tasteless, invisible gas and a proven carcinogen. In fact, radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Radon is present both outdoors and indoors in every type of building. Because there is no known safe level of exposure to radon, the EPA recommends that Americans do radon testing and consider fixing their homes when the radon level is between 2pCi/L and 4pCi/L. In contrast, the average concentration of radon in outdoor air is .4pCi/L or 1/10th of EPA’s 4pCi/L action level.

Combustion Pollutants

Combustion pollutants such as carbon monoxide and tobacco smoke are also a threat to indoor air quality and your health.

Carbon Monoxide

Unlike VOCs, one cannot taste, smell or see carbon monoxide. At lower concentrations it can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, fatigue, or chest pain. At higher concentrations, however, it can cause unconsciousness and death. Primary sources of carbon monoxide include kerosene and gas space heaters, fireplaces, generators, and poorly maintained boilers and furnaces. For this reason, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that consumers have a professional inspection of all fuel-burning appliances like furnaces, stoves, fireplaces, clothes dryers, water heaters, and space heaters, to detect dangerous carbon monoxide leaks.

Other combustion pollutants such as tobacco smoke are easier to identify or at least detect from their odor. When the source of an odor cannot be determined, indoor air quality (IAQ) testing may be necessary. Our qualified environmental and IAQ professionals at Mold Authority know what to look for and how to identify the causes of problematic odors.

New York Indoor Air Quality Inspection Service

Whether your problem is a biological, chemical or combustion pollutant, Mold Authority can identify it and develop an effective strategy to eliminate or reduce harmful exposures. We provide indoor air quality testing in order to safeguard the health of your family or coworkers. Within New York City, we offer mold and air quality inspection and testing services in the Bronx (Bronx County), Brooklyn (Kings County), Manhattan (New York County), Queens (Queens County) and Staten Island (Richmond County). If you live in the New York Metropolitan area, contact Mold Authority to speak to one of our trained staff about your air quality issues.